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MICHIGAN MONSTERS

One of my correspondents recently asked me about monsters in the Great Lakes. I thought I'd share my answer with everybody on the list.

Jean, Gary Coults of Special Lake Investigations in Ohio specializes in studying "South Lake Bessie" in Lake Erie. His address is 7507 Wahi Road #A2, Vickery, OH 43464-9609. I've never contacted him, but these kinds of folks are usually very open with information. If you get any, please let me know.

Reports go back at least as far as 1817. It was described as being between 35 and 60 feet and to have bright eyes. The monster has been seen as recently as summer of 1993. One sighting was about 2 miles off Kellys Island. That critter was estimated at 15 feet to 25 feet. Typical of lake monsters, it moved with an up and down motion (which indicates a mammal, most likely, rather than a reptile or a fish). You might also contact Tom Solberg, the owner of the Huron Lagoons Marina. Apparently, he is some sort of spokesperson for a group which has offered over $100,00 in prize money for the creature "delivered alive and unharmed". Also, marine biologist Dr. Charles Herdendorf thinks the monster may have been photographed by a satellite.

A monster was reported in Lake Ontario as well, at least according to a German science journal in 1835. Lakes Huron, Michigan, and Superior supposedly have generated reports, although I can't tell you much about them.

Lake monster reports specifically from Michigan have come from: Alpena at Thunder Bay in the late 1880s; Cheboygan in the mid 1970s (see GRAND RAPIDS PRESS for 6/25/1976); Muskegon in 1892, although now considered a hoax; Petoskey in 1892, although a possible hoax; Au Train Lake and Basswood Lake; Swan Lake in 1946 (although it may have been a swimming cow); Nichols Lake; Narrow Lake; Williams Lake; the Paint River; and Trout Bay in the mid 1920s.

It may also be worth noting that there was a book written by Jay Gourley called THE GREAT LAKES TRIANGLE which the "splash" on the cover claimed was "Deadlier Than The Bermuda Triangle". I don't think it used lake monsters as a possible explanation, however ;} .